Category Archives: Water

Lake Huron and Elgin Water Supply Systems

The Lake Huron and Elgin Water Supply Systems are separate systems that are conjoined to service a number of municipalities in Southwestern Ontario. The system operator is the Ontario Clean Water Agency (OCWA)(reference).

Entering Survival Mode

Survivalism if it is an “ism” has been around for decades as a current societal meme practiced by many. We have become increasingly of such a persuasion. Fixing the world is a waste of time and money – it can’t be done. It’s like viewing a hurricane forming in the Atlantic. Most people will be unaware of it until it is 10 miles offshore; and nothing can be done to either prevent its formation or its development. The solution for New Orleans residents was not to board up windows as the storm approached but to move out of New Orleans long before Katrina formed.

In this post we try and identify where our Katrinas will emerge from and to develop a survival strategy. If you’re interested in participating in this project, write “water at digitaldoor dot net”. To prevent webcrawlers from harvesting this address, replace “at” with the ampersand and “dot” with a period. We lay out below, the structure of the project we are launching.

Water Wars

Of this theme, long predicted, but now emergent, we will start to cover. Currently, the issue is developing in California where water rights have a long history of legal assignment. Zero Hedge posted an article giving some background on the nature and history of water rights in In Unprecedented Move, California Farmers With Guaranteed Rights Cut Water Use By 25%.

Chronology of references and events:

The Perfect Storm

The Brookings Institute continued their series on Metropolitan America with the article Population surging in drought-stricken areas. Their observation is that the areas of greatest population growth are coincident with the areas of extreme drought. We reproduce their two maps below.

We have been following the drought aspect for over a year for California (read California is the Canary and the links within it) and Nevada (read Jeopardy Question: This Body of Water Determines the Fate of the Modern Day Anasazi).

The Global Water Problem

This is a widely discussed topic of which we have been peripherally aware. We have decided to start collecting references in the same manner as we are doing with automation and robotics (Robotics In the Labour Market). These are large transformative issues that will be major drivers of change in our society in the near future.

We have been tracking the drought in the US southwest. The latest essay is California is the Canary should have enough of a bread crumb trail that you can find out many previous essays on the topic.

The motivational article that prompted this post is from Zero Hedge: Jim Rogers On The Coming Water Wars. This gives a brief introduction to the problem. Below we have a chronology of references.

California is the Canary

We examined the western U.S. drought in an essay published July 1, 2014: Jeopardy Question: This Body of Water Determines the Fate of the Modern Day Anasazi. In it we focused on the situation of Lake Mead, the reservoir is a vital source of drinking and irrigation water for Las Vegas and eastern California. The reservoir is also important for power generation since it forms the forebay of the Hoover Dam generating station.

Eat your Broccoli Now

In Another Dry Essay we discussed the drought in California with a chronology of links to related articles through October 2014. We followed up in December with The U.S. South-West Drought Revisited.

Recently we checked the drought monitor and although the drought severity has dropped from most severe or D4 in the north and south it remains most severe for the central region of the state as seen in Figure 1. The table in the monitor with the corresponding data shows that as of March 3, 2015, 39.92% of the state was in the D4 category. A year ago the figure was 22.37%, almost half.

Industrial Expansion Will Strain Mexico’s Water Resources

Text Size

Summary

Editor’s Note: This is the eighth installment of an occasional series on water scarcity issues around the world that Stratfor will be building upon periodically.

Much like its northern neighbor, Mexico is not water scarce when viewed as a whole. But unequal water distribution has led to significant water stress in several parts of the country. Supply has been further strained by poor infrastructure, pollution and overuse — partly attributable to inefficient management and a growing population. Still, Mexico is positioned to experience significant economic growth because of its proximity to the United States and the likely expansion of its manufacturing sector as the country’s population increases.

The U.S. South-West Drought Revisited

We initially looked at the California drought in February of this year in our essay, Another Dry Essay. Since no one is currently writing about it we thought we would review the situation.

A Picture of the California Drought

Two themes that we identified early on as having the potential to affect the North American economy are the drought is the US Southwest and Pacific regions. Ebola we update via email since we have not bothered to write about it. It is progressing nicely with major economic dislocation in the West African countries most affected and a growing impact in the developed world. This is still in early stages.

The other story we are tracking is the drought in California (read Another Dry Essay). The following video clip by the New yorker provides a poignant glimpse into the lives of those on the front lines.

The US Drought Monitor for Oct. 16 shows no change from that shown in Another Dry Essay for Sept.

Update: 20150420

This essay attempts to document the human suffering associated with the California drought. An article today in Zero Hedge by Michael Snyder titled Another Reason To Move Away From California: “Conditions Are Like A Third-World Country”, touches on the impact of depleted groundwater supplies. Residents and farmers in the interior are having to drill down 1800′ for water. Many can’t afford this and will have to abandon their properties.

Update: 20150724

Pictures of depleted reservoirs: A Stunning Look At California’s Historic Drought – From The Air.

Powered by WordPress | Designed by: photography charlottesville va | Thanks to ppc software, penny auction and larry goins