Tag Archives: AGW

Bits and Pieces – 20181209, Sunday

Commentary

It’s 3:20 AM Monday morning and I can’t sleep. Apart from the fact that my ancient thermostat settings have not dropped the daytime high of 65 degrees (it predates metric conversion) to 62 degrees where I would like it, the Liberal carbon tax is bothering me. And it should also be bothering you very much.

Two weeks ago (Bits and Pieces – 20181125, Sunday) I opened with a discouce on energy and the universal requirement of it in some form by all organism both living and inanimate such as cities. What I didn’t do was to reduce all forms of energy to a common unit of measurement which is popularly, the joule. We measure the energy content of food in calories which are easily converted to joules. Electricity we measure in watts which also convert easily. Heat energy from burning fossil fuels is directly measured in joules.

What I will now argue is that you have a minimal energy footprint which if not met for a period of time will result in your death. There is a daily calorie requirement below which you will certainly starve to death. How far below this limit determines how fast death comes. The production of those calories requires a certain amount of fossil fuel to grow them. A farmer has to drive a tractor over a field multiple times to till and prepare a seedbed, plant the seeds, apply fertilizers and agricultural chemicals (to kill everything but the crop) and to harvest the crop. That’s a lot of diesel. Add in the energy required to get the food to your table. So just in terms of food, there is a significant amount of fossil fuel expenditure necessary to keep yoy from starving.

Likewise, in Northern latitudes, there is a minimum temperature at which you can maintain your environment before you freeze to death or die of hypothermia (read: Britain’s Excess Winter Deaths Soar To Highest In Over 40 Years).

A more complex argument in details is the need for fossil fuels to support your daily life including getting to and from work so you can pay for the joules you need to survive. Renewables aren’t the answer because they are not a reliable source of energy when you need it and will never be for certain applications like farming. This is another discussion but it involves something called capacity factor which the Ontario government now hides. Or in other words, behind every wind mill lurks a gas-fired thermal plant.

The point is that you have a minimum carbon footprint below which you die. Cities have a minimum carbon footprint below which the city dies.

Bits and Pieces – 20181118, Sunday

Correction

An alert German reader kindly pointed out an error that I had made in the Climate section of my last post (now corrected). I had written:
Here is the actual discussion of the error: Nick Stokes on A major problem with the Resplandy et al. ocean heat uptake paper and here is a followup article by the same author…

In fact both articles were written by Nic Lewis. I have no idea how or why I inserted the name “Nick Stokes”.

Commentary

When I mentioned to a friend that the caravan invading the US’s southern border is well-funded, well-planned and highly organized by some external organization(s) she said she hadn’t heard of such a thing.

So here’s the evidence. In a Fox News video, Tucker Carlson interviews filmmaker Ami Horowitz who embedded himself in the caravan and filmed aspects of it:

Bits and Pieces – 20181104, Sunday

Commentary

Last night I watched this long 2-part video comparing the fall of the American Empire (AE) to the fall of the Roman Empire. It identifies 3 principle economic causes, the ongoing cost of foreign wars, public works, and social entitlement programs, leading to deficit spending. This in turn leads to the necessary debasement of the currency and punitive taxes to support the deficit. Here is the first part which will automatically link to the second part at the end:

The creator of this video has interviewed a number of extremely clued-in people – I follow them all when they are not behind a paywall.

Although the video is about the AE, it is equally applicable to Canada and the countries of Europe. We are in the late stage of decline before revolution.

Bits and Pieces – 20181026, Sunday

Commentary

I have been distracted by an unsuccessful run in municipal politics. It took a few hours of reflection to analyze my emotional response and an gain an understanding of the event. Here it is. But first some background on the results.

There were 8 candidates running for 4 positions. Three were 3 incumbents and one person returning to office after a term or two off. The fifth was a local realtor and Strathroy native, well known in the community. That left 3 unknowns including myself who is new to town. Poll results were in the order I described the candidates. I polled 747 votes for 6th place (first place was over 2700 votes) but only 31 votes ahead of the last place finisher. I tell people I tied for last place which I think is an astute assessment.

When asked if I was disappointed in not winning – in my mind were scenarios where I might have won – I replied “no” as I have a couple of projects that I could now get on with. What I was disappointed in was that I did not think the results reflected the effort, time and money that my wife and I invested in the election.

Finally, there was the understanding of two major points that were present when I decided to run but that I did not understand. This in itself was a brilliant flash of insight: nothing changed over the entire period except my understanding of the situstion.

The first point, and this is key I think to all politics, is that there were no major issues with the past administration. People had their personal peeves – their street has potholes, the town needs an indoor pool, etc. – and there were a few individuals that did not like the mayor or a particular Councillor. However, there was no single major issue such as corruption manifested in some form or other, to cause dissatisfaction with the previous administration.

Whether you gave them an “A”, “B”, or “C”, they earned a pass. An “F” would have created a totally different situation. Despite comments from many that I spoke to about needing “new blood” on council, the old adage,”if it ain’t broke don’t try and fix it” held sway and wisely so.

The second point is that I am new to town. One Councillor is a retired high school teacher and has taught half the community. Those re-elected are widely known, most having grown up here. Although Strathroy is growing fast, it has that small town core of residents where everyone knows everyone else. In some small towns it takes generations before you become accepted fully in the community.

In short, I didn’t stand a chance. Nor will I in 2022 unless these two conditions change. There is also an age factor. This election was difficult in terms of going door-to-door for 3, 4, 5 or more hours at a time. It won’t be easier in 4 years.

I knocked on about 750 doors out of an estimated 7500. I talked to an amazing array of people. None were hostile and most were warm in their response. You sized up the situation in a fraction of a second to determine your approach. When a man or woman answered a door holding 2 children with three in the background running around with 5 barking dogs, you read very quickly that this person isn’t looking for any kind of a conversation. One woman may even have been nursing an infant although I was careful not to stare to see if this was the case or not. The closest to having someone answer the door naked was a tall fellow wearing only shorts riding below a belly that suggested that he hadn’t seen his feet in a decade or two. I sensed very quickly he didn’t want to talk.

It was hard work and the most enjoyable part of the campaign by far – a valued experience.

With this I can put it behind me.

Bits and Pieces – 20180910, Monday

Commentary

I would argue that mankind has always progressed through technological innovation from the production of stone tools and the control of fire, through the metallurgical discoveries giving us iron, steel and other metals that enabled the industrial revolution, to modern digital technology. The arts grew alongside the technology but as an economic adjunct enabled by the wealth and leisure it produced. Similarly, the affluence that spawned the modern welfare state is a benefit of technological progress.

I read John Mauldin’s latest letter on the rise of China. Part 1 of 3 promised parts, it creates a sense of optimism in China’s future through technology. Here’s the article: China’s Command Innovation.

Mauldin is a technology-based optimist. His projection is too linear and insular for my comfort, however. The technological advances he sees coming are logically predictable as a linear projection of current progress.

However, the ascendancy of China is anathema to the American Empire. One can see the rhetoric and military expansion that the US is using to try and contain China. The same containment used against Japan resulting in WWII, when used against China, will result in WWIII.

This will set back all areas  of technological development except perhaps military ones. A nuclear exchange may make the setback permanent.

A visit to a local museum had a large display of stone artifacts used by the local neolithic nomads. There were rounded rocks that had been used as primitive tools, but the largest part of the collection by far were the arrow heads which showed rather sophisticated manufacture. The principal use of iron and the development of blacksmithing started with the manufacture of iron knives and swords.

Apart from war, the arrival of the next Grand Solar Minimum is another factor that, based on historical precedence as described by Martin Armstrong in the section “Climate” below, will be a powerful disrupting force. It has brought down entire dynasties and civilizations in the past.

My thoughts about Mauldin’s optimism – he is one of the best free sources of economic thought out there – have been with me for a long time. China’s economic ascendancy he sees as a source of optimism about our future. But what really hit home to me today was how much in contrast, the West is in decline. Read the article. Now think about a future where the Chinese are producing STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) graduates, the basis for wealth generation in a technological future while we are producing graduates in the arts, particularly social sciences like gender studies.

***

The MSM and the AGW alarmist are using the extremes in weather as an alleged proof of the global warming hypothesis. They report record heat and record drought events while failing to report any of the thousands of record cold and record snowfall events that were occurring throughout the late winter and spring of this year.

The current heat and drought in Europe are not unusual as revealed by the appearance of “hunger stones”. I’ve seen a couple of references to this but Martin Armstrong has a good discussion around the topic: The Hunger Stones Have Appeared. Such stones have appeared in several rivers to which you should be able to find references if interested. I wonder if they will add 2018 to the rocks.

Bits and Pieces – 20180726, Thursday

Commentary

This post contains a special section under climate topic for a friend.

Bits and Pieces – 20180721, Saturday

Commentary

As you will have discerned by now, I consider that the CIA is the most evil organization on the planet. Much of its subversive operation has come into public awareness through declassified official documents, apart from accounts by people previously close to its operations. The problem is that it can take 50 years before documents get declassified and even then may be heavily redacted. Fortunately there are enough discerning people ferreting out its activities today.

A year ago I had thought to write an article about the CIA by collecting references to its activities involving assassinations of foreign officials and coups against democratically elected foreign governments. As I started to do research I discovered such a trove of information by people who had already gone down this path that I abandoned the effort as superfluous, other than for my own enlightenment.

In this post I will link to an article, the first of three parts, that details the actions of the US in Syria though its primary instrument of covert foreign intervention and subversion, the CIA. It should be a good addition to your reference list.

Bits and Pieces – 20180703, Tuesday

Commentary

I watch a lot of YouTube videos  (we have no TV) for evening entertainment. Their recommendation algorithms throw up really interesting recommendations occasionally and I jot notes to follow up. This post is such a followup catch-up. It will be hopefully brief and somewhat eclectic. as an accumulation of weeks of cryptic sticky notes.

Bits and Pieces – 20180423, Monday

Commentary

Jim Quinn has just published WINTER IS COMING (PART THREE), his third essay in a series based on the book The Fourth Turning by Strauss & Howe. It explains how the state of global political unrest is the end state of the current fourth turning.

I continue to make minor changes in the organization of the structure of these posts.

Bits and Pieces – 20171229, Friday

Commentary: Closing off 2017. War has not broken out either in North Korea or the Middle East. However, the issues in these two areas remain unresolved. Iran seems to be the likely flash point.

I’ve been following the global cooling issue coincidentally with the grand solar minimum (GSM) and am convinced that it will be the most important event of the next decade next to a global war and a global economic collapse. In fact the three events have strong co-dependencies.

I am now publishing Bits and Pieces 3 or 4 times a month. This will continue but my focus is shifting to the GSM and its implications.

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