Tag Archives: Iraq

Bits and Pieces – 20171215, Friday

WWIII: The following article provides a summary of the multinational military activity in the wars in Iraq and Syria. The accuracy of the numbers may be questioned but the key point is that this is a global war. It is notable that Canada’s role has been omitted: World War in Syria and Iraq (MAP).

Turkey, the Kurds and Iraq: The Prize and Peril of Kirkuk

Print Text Size

By Reva Bhalla

In June 1919, aboard an Allied warship en route to Paris, sat Damat Ferid Pasha, the Grand Vizier of a crumbling Ottoman Empire. The elderly statesman, donning an iconic red fez and boasting an impeccably groomed mustache, held in his hands a memorandum that he was to present to the Allied powers at the Quai d’Orsay. The negotiations on postwar reparations started five months earlier, but the Ottoman delegation was prepared to make the most of its tardy invitation to the talks. As he journeyed across the Mediterranean that summer toward the French shore, Damat Ferid mentally rehearsed the list of demands he would make to the Allied powers during his last-ditch effort to hold the empire together.

Ukraine, Iraq and a Black Sea Strategy

By George Friedman

The United States is, at the moment, off balance. It faces challenges in the Syria-Iraq theater as well as challenges in Ukraine. It does not have a clear response to either. It does not know what success in either theater would look like, what resources it is prepared to devote to either, nor whether the consequences of defeat would be manageable.

A dilemma of this sort is not unusual for a global power. Its very breadth of interests and the extent of power create opportunities for unexpected events, and these events, particularly simultaneous challenges in different areas, create uncertainty and confusion. U.S. geography and power permit a degree of uncertainty without leading to disaster, but generating a coherent and integrated strategy is necessary, even if that strategy is simply to walk away and let events run their course. I am not suggesting the latter strategy but arguing that at a certain point, confusion must run its course and clear intentions must emerge. When they do, the result will be the coherence of a new strategic map that encompasses both conflicts.

The most critical issue for the United States is to create a single integrated plan that takes into account the most pressing challenges. Such a plan must begin by defining a theater of operations sufficiently coherent geographically as to permit integrated political maneuvering and military planning. U.S. military doctrine has moved explicitly away from a two-war strategy. Operationally, it might not be possible to engage all adversaries simultaneously, but conceptually, it is essential to think in terms of a coherent center of gravity of operations. For me, it is increasingly clear that that center is the Black Sea.

Iraq and Syria Follow Lebanon’s Precedent

By George Friedman

Lebanon was created out of the Sykes-Picot Agreement. This agreement between Britain and France reshaped the collapsed Ottoman Empire south of Turkey into the states we know today — Lebanon, Syria and Iraq, and to some extent the Arabian Peninsula as well. For nearly 100 years, Sykes-Picot defined the region. A strong case can be made that the nation-states Sykes-Picot created are now defunct, and that what is occurring in Syria and Iraq represents the emergence of those post-British/French maps that the United States has been trying to maintain since the collapse of Franco-British power.

Worsening Violence in Iraq Threatens Regional Security

Print Text Size

Summary

Battles continue to rage across northern Iraq, pitting jihadist group the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant against Iraqi security forces and their allies. The growing reach of the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant has escalated an already brutal campaign in Iraq. Alarmingly quick advances by the militants across an important region of the Middle East could draw in regional powers as well as the United States.

Tracking the Spread of Peace and Democracy by Western Powers

We have not seen any comprehensive tracking of the peace and prosperity brought to places like Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, Egypt and now the Ukraine by Western nations such as the US, Canada and NATO. This post is a placeholder for articles we come across. By country:

Western Foreign Policy Success Updated

Recall how in our efforts to overthrow evil tyrants and bring peace and democracy to the oppressed, we invaded Iraq, deposing the murderous Saddam Hussein. We thought you might like a current measure of the fruit of our labour. From NightWatch yesterday:

On Friday, 84 people were killed and 77 wounded in attacks in 12 towns. Most of them were shooting intermixed with a few bombings. On Saturday, 46 people were killed and 106 were injured in 17 towns. Most of the attacks were bombings, with a few shootings and clashes. On Sunday, 77 people were killed and 223 injured by bombings and shootings in 18 towns.

That’s 207 dead and 406 injured in 3 days. Not bad! The Iraqi people are so much better off now. Right? And now that we are just about finished bringing peace and democracy to Afghanistan, think of how bright their future will be for Afghanis, especially for those who collaborated with the allied forces. They’ll be paraded through the streets as heroes, right? Surely Syria is about ready for Western intervention and salvation. And Egypt is just warming up. Such exciting times ahead for Western foreign policy wonks.

Stratfor Videos: Spain and the Northwestern Persian Gulf

Spain’s Geographic Challenge

This 2:05 minute video gives a brief outline of Spain’s geographic challenges. It’s useful when considering the recent calls for provincial  secessions.

Geopolitics of the Northwestern Persian Gulf

A short (1:59 minute) video outlining the problem between Iraq and Kuwait for Persian Gulf access.
x

Powered by WordPress | Designed by: photography charlottesville va | Thanks to ppc software, penny auction and larry goins