Tag Archives: Ontario

The Ontario Jobs Picture in March: Treading Water – Sharks Nibbling

This month we change our reporting format to more of a streamlined summary. For data we use the Ontario labour market component  from Statistics Canada: CANSIM Table 282-0087, Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by sex and age group, seasonally adjusted and unadjusted monthly, and CANSIM Table 282-0088, Labour force survey estimates (LFS), employment by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), seasonally adjusted and unadjusted.

The Lies My Mommy Told Me, Part III

We review employment in Ontario periodically. When we saw the Toronto Star article Ontario leads Canada with 19,800 new jobs in January, we decided to see if the headline was true considering that several macro events have occurred: Canada is in recession, the oil market has collapsed and so has the Loonie. We might expect the first two events to decrease employment while the third event should reflect an increase in manufacturing jobs for the export market in particular. Let’s take a look.

In this report we present our analysis of the Ontario labour market component of the total Canadian market using two sources of data from Statistics Canada: CANSIM Table 282-0087, Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by sex and age group, seasonally adjusted and unadjusted monthly, and CANSIM Table 282-0088, Labour force survey estimates (LFS), employment by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), seasonally adjusted and unadjusted. Data selection methodology is in the Appendix. The data we use is not seasonally adjusted* (also read our view of seasonal adjustment in The Lies My Mommy Told Me, Part II). All terms are explained in the CANSIM table footnotes and are not reproduced here.

Lake Huron and Elgin Water Supply Systems

The Lake Huron and Elgin Water Supply Systems are separate systems that are conjoined to service a number of municipalities in Southwestern Ontario. The system operator is the Ontario Clean Water Agency (OCWA)(reference).

The Ontario Employment Picture: March, 2015 – Continuing Deterioration

The last time we reviewed employment in Ontario was the December report: The Ontario Employment Picture: December, 2014 – Deteriorating. We have heard nothing from the province about jobs created so we suspect the numbers are not good. Let’s dig into them.

In this report we present our analysis of the Ontario labour market component of the total Canadian market using two sources of data from Statistics Canada: CANSIM Table 282-0087, Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by sex and age group, seasonally adjusted and unadjusted monthly, and CANSIM Table 282-0088, Labour force survey estimates (LFS), employment by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), seasonally adjusted and unadjusted. Data selection methodology is in the Appendix. The data we use is not seasonally adjusted*. All terms are explained in the CANSIM table footnotes and are not reproduced here. Presentation and discussion of the data follows.

The Ontario Employment Picture: December, 2014 – Deteriorating

December’s job losses in the Canadian labour market of 89,800 exceeded the 58,400 jobs lost in November. Of this number, 36% were in Ontario which has 39% of Canada’s population. Analysis of the data shows that the public sector is responsible for 56% of the job growth in the province.

The Ontario Employment Picture: November, 2014

Overall, the Canadian labour market lost 58,400 jobs in November, more than half in Ontario. The only growth was in Alberta and Saskatchewan.

In this report we present our analysis of the Ontario labour market component of the total Canadian market using two sources of data from Statistics Canada: CANSIM Table 282-0087, Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by sex and age group, seasonally adjusted and unadjusted monthly, and CANSIM Table 282-0088, Labour force survey estimates (LFS), employment by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), seasonally adjusted and unadjusted. Data selection methodology is in the Appendix. The data we use is not seasonally adjusted. Presentation and discussion of the data follows.

So How Much Do We Owe?

The Ontario Government recently released its annual mid-term economic report 2014 Ontario Economic Outlook and Fiscal Review. We review the provincial debt situation in light of this report.

Blowin’ In The Wind

Yes, how many times can a man turn his head
Pretending he just doesn’t see?
The answer my friend is blowin’ in the wind
The answer is blowin’ in the wind.

— Bob Dylan, Blowin’ in the Wind

Yesterday Ontario ‘s Energy Minister, Bob Chiarelli was blowing in the wind again when he said:

“Businesses will come and go in Ontario … The reality is that there are more coming in than are leaving — very significant.”

— Bob Chiarelli (Toronto SUN: ‘Businesses will come and go in Ontario’: Energy minister)

Although an apparently simple claim at face value, it bears some careful examination. The phrase are more coming in than are leaving would focus on number of companies whereas the real issue is the number of jobs and the relative value of those jobs. To examine Chiarelli’s claim we will look at overall employment numbers and average wages in two industry sectors, goods-producing industries that include manufacturing, construction and natural resource extraction, and service-producing industries.

The Ontario Employment Picture: October, 2014

We have decided to do a monthly analysis of the Ontario labour market using two sources of data from Statistics Canada, CANSIM Table 282-0087, Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by sex and age group, seasonally adjusted and unadjusted monthly, and CANSIM Table 282-0088, Labour force survey estimates (LFS), employment by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), seasonally adjusted and unadjusted. Data selection methodology is in the Appendix. Presentation and discussion of the data follows.

Beauty and the Beast: Mom’s Latest Child

The Ontario Government released a statement on August 8th titled Ontario Gains 15,100 Jobs in July. In The Real Job Situation in Ontario: Ugly we analyzed the employment numbers for Ontario for June, 2014. Overall we noted:

First we look at the last year’s worth of data in CANSIM Table 282-0087, Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by sex and age group, seasonally adjusted and unadjusted monthly. From June 2013 to June 2014, the number of people employed increased by 22,000. This is composed of an increase of 31,200 full-time jobs and a loss of 9,200 part-time jobs. This reflects a modest improvement, year over year, in the job situation with a net increase and a likely conversion of part-time into full-time jobs.

Now we get a look at Kathleen Wynne’s latest child, the July numbers. Turns out that June was Beauty and July is … well read on.

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