Tag Archives: structural unemployment

Bits and Pieces – 20170320, Monday

Commentary: We sold our house late last week and have been preoccupied with related issues. Life is now returning to normal whatever that is.

I have voiced a concern about the structural unemployment coming due to robotics, auto,ation and artificial intelligence (RAAI). Today I publish links to articles on the psychological and sociological, particularly on men. Also, by now you understand that although these are often treated as vertical issues explored by linear deterministic thinking and models, the reality is that these are aspects of a deeply complex system.

Bits and Pieces – 20170310, Friday

Commentary: Perhaps the most important article for Canadian readers today is a ZeroHedge report on new data from the BIS (Bank of International Settlements – sometimes called the central bankers bank because it acts as a global banking watchdog): Whose Banks Are Riskiest: A Surprising Answer From The BIS. The Canadian banks deny any risk as does the government. However, not believing either institutions, I am mapping out a defensive strategy which I will publish at a later date.

This article is a short summary of what I have been saying about jobs: If You Think Your Job Is One That Cannot Be Automated, You’re In For A Rude Awakening. The 5-10 year time-frame for this to unfold is the time-frame for the point of no return for the collapse of Western civilization. The 15 minute video in it I embed below. It is extremely well produced and is comprehensive in its coverage:

The key point in this video is that of the horses. Hint: we didn’t need all the horses of the pre-auto age AND WE DON’T HAVE THEM TODAY.

Civil Unrest: Here is an articles discussing civil war in the US: Is The Left Trying To Start A Civil War?

I realized today that the disregard for the democratic process in the US by those who refuse to accept the outcome and are actively working to reverse the result in a soft coup – to overthrow Trump – are really seeking a totalitarian form of government that embodies their ideologies.

Cyber Warfare: More commentary on the cyber warfare being waged by the CIA on … uh, anyone and everyone apparently: CIA’s Dirty Cyber Tricks Exposed: “UMBRAGE” & Potential False Flag Attacks” and The most shocking revelation from the CIA spying scandal. And I thought all the viruses and Trojans I have dealt with over the year came from bored high school kids working out of their parents’ basements or Russian mob technicians: WikiLeaks Holds Press Conference On CIA Hacking, Will Share Hacking Tools With Tech Firms.

As a result of the revelation of the UMBRAGE project the CIA, the CIA cannot credibly identify a hack or intrusion as Russian in source.

Bits and Pieces – 20170224, Friday

Commentary: I had come to the point of thinking that writing and presenting factual material had little value other than to myself – which is why I continue to do so. In conversations with people I had noticed that when presented with facts contrary to their position they seemed to back off but fail to change their position. Here’s support for that observation: Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds. To note: “Once formed, impressions are remarkably perseverant.” This points to our early life as the formative stage for many of our narratives about the world. It also shows the danger the school system poses when it strays beyond the 3 Rs.

The writer notes “People believe that they know way more than they actually do. What allows us to persist in this belief is other people.” This is due to the sociability nature of our species. The application of this principle to current events (Trump) is enlightening since”as a rule, strong feelings about issues do not emerge from deep understanding,” but from what we hear from friends and read in the MSM, particularly if it reinforces what we already believe we know (confirmation bias).

Flash Point: It’s Structural

We have long argued that the problems of employment in the US are structural, not cyclical (Flash Point: Why High Unemployment Is Structural, Signs of a Structural Change in the US Economy, The Hole in Jackson Hole, What’s the Future for Jobs?). Today, Mike Shedlock adds his perspective on the argument: No Progress for Long-Term Unemployed; Ten Reasons the Problem is Structural.

Further, while the US is in a very tepid cyclical recovery, certainly the worst since World War II, the changes in the employment situation are also very tepid with changes in the structure of the job market to a part-time economy the most troubling aspect. Expect a similar argument for Canada.

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