Tag Archives: volcanoes

Bits and Pieces – 20181104, Sunday

Commentary

Last night I watched this long 2-part video comparing the fall of the American Empire (AE) to the fall of the Roman Empire. It identifies 3 principle economic causes, the ongoing cost of foreign wars, public works, and social entitlement programs, leading to deficit spending. This in turn leads to the necessary debasement of the currency and punitive taxes to support the deficit. Here is the first part which will automatically link to the second part at the end:

The creator of this video has interviewed a number of extremely clued-in people – I follow them all when they are not behind a paywall.

Although the video is about the AE, it is equally applicable to Canada and the countries of Europe. We are in the late stage of decline before revolution.

Bits and Pieces – 20171205, Monday

Commentary: While politicians, bureaucrats, the media and the general public are obsessing over the impact of anthropogenic CO2 on the climate and a segment of the climate science industry is busy trying to make models and data agree with the political agenda, other climate scientists are studying a much broader range of factors that are affecting our climate.

Holy Smoke, Batman!

Jeffrey Saut, Chief Investment Strategist at Raymond James reports in a King World News interview (noted for its hyperbole in prose) that Massive Volcanic Eruptions Wreaking Havoc On The World. He states:

You also have a drought in Texas.  One of my themes, Eric, has been the weird weather.  The world is actually cooling, not warming.  What’s causing this is the volcanic ash in the air.  You’ve got more volcanic ash in the air than at any time in recorded history.

As with all climate phenomena, “recorded history” consisting of reliable and consistent observation and measurement is very short. We simply note the comments to preserve them for future investigation.

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