What We’re Watching

In no particular order and with no ranking of importance as we see it: Global seismic and geothermal activity. Are the events linked and if so will activity increase? Japanese monetary policy. Will Abenomics finally implode and take the Japanese bond market with it? The US presidential race. What happens with and around Trump may Continue reading »

Bits and Pieces – 20181118, Sunday

Correction

An alert German reader kindly pointed out an error that I had made in the Climate section of my last post (now corrected). I had written:
Here is the actual discussion of the error: Nick Stokes on A major problem with the Resplandy et al. ocean heat uptake paper and here is a followup article by the same author…

In fact both articles were written by Nic Lewis. I have no idea how or why I inserted the name “Nick Stokes”.

Commentary

When I mentioned to a friend that the caravan invading the US’s southern border is well-funded, well-planned and highly organized by some external organization(s) she said she hadn’t heard of such a thing.

So here’s the evidence. In a Fox News video, Tucker Carlson interviews filmmaker Ami Horowitz who embedded himself in the caravan and filmed aspects of it:

Here’s another video of caravan participants being paid for their efforts:

I’ve seen other articles describing Democratic interests funneling money to the enterprise and speculation that organization funded by George Soros are behind it. Search the alternative media for a lot more.

Exercise

This topic is part of a series of health-related topics with a focus on anti-aging. Most of the source material comes from a weekly eletter from the economist Patrick Cox who has an investment advisory service for the biotechnology field with Mauldin Economics.

Stem Cell Research

This topic is part of a series of health-related topics with a focus on anti-aging. Most of the source material comes from a weekly eletter from the economist Patrick Cox who has an investment advisory service for the biotechnology field with Mauldin Economics.

Anti-Aging

This topic is part of a series of health-related topics with a focus on anti-aging. Most of the source material comes from a weekly eletter from the economist Patrick Cox who has an investment advisory service for the biotechnology field with Mauldin Economics.

Dietary Supplements

This topic is part of a series of health-related topics with a focus on anti-aging. Most of the source material comes from a weekly eletter from the economist Patrick Cox who has an investment advisory service for the biotechnology field with Mauldin Economics.

Bits and Pieces – 20181111, Sunday

Commentary

There are some longer videos in this week’s report but I consider them worthwhile. Beats watching TV.

Bits and Pieces – 20181104, Sunday

Commentary

Last night I watched this long 2-part video comparing the fall of the American Empire (AE) to the fall of the Roman Empire. It identifies 3 principle economic causes, the ongoing cost of foreign wars, public works, and social entitlement programs, leading to deficit spending. This in turn leads to the necessary debasement of the currency and punitive taxes to support the deficit. Here is the first part which will automatically link to the second part at the end:

The creator of this video has interviewed a number of extremely clued-in people – I follow them all when they are not behind a paywall.

Although the video is about the AE, it is equally applicable to Canada and the countries of Europe. We are in the late stage of decline before revolution.

Bits and Pieces – 20181026, Sunday

Commentary

I have been distracted by an unsuccessful run in municipal politics. It took a few hours of reflection to analyze my emotional response and an gain an understanding of the event. Here it is. But first some background on the results.

There were 8 candidates running for 4 positions. Three were 3 incumbents and one person returning to office after a term or two off. The fifth was a local realtor and Strathroy native, well known in the community. That left 3 unknowns including myself who is new to town. Poll results were in the order I described the candidates. I polled 747 votes for 6th place (first place was over 2700 votes) but only 31 votes ahead of the last place finisher. I tell people I tied for last place which I think is an astute assessment.

When asked if I was disappointed in not winning – in my mind were scenarios where I might have won – I replied “no” as I have a couple of projects that I could now get on with. What I was disappointed in was that I did not think the results reflected the effort, time and money that my wife and I invested in the election.

Finally, there was the understanding of two major points that were present when I decided to run but that I did not understand. This in itself was a brilliant flash of insight: nothing changed over the entire period except my understanding of the situstion.

The first point, and this is key I think to all politics, is that there were no major issues with the past administration. People had their personal peeves – their street has potholes, the town needs an indoor pool, etc. – and there were a few individuals that did not like the mayor or a particular Councillor. However, there was no single major issue such as corruption manifested in some form or other, to cause dissatisfaction with the previous administration.

Whether you gave them an “A”, “B”, or “C”, they earned a pass. An “F” would have created a totally different situation. Despite comments from many that I spoke to about needing “new blood” on council, the old adage,”if it ain’t broke don’t try and fix it” held sway and wisely so.

The second point is that I am new to town. One Councillor is a retired high school teacher and has taught half the community. Those re-elected are widely known, most having grown up here. Although Strathroy is growing fast, it has that small town core of residents where everyone knows everyone else. In some small towns it takes generations before you become accepted fully in the community.

In short, I didn’t stand a chance. Nor will I in 2022 unless these two conditions change. There is also an age factor. This election was difficult in terms of going door-to-door for 3, 4, 5 or more hours at a time. It won’t be easier in 4 years.

I knocked on about 750 doors out of an estimated 7500. I talked to an amazing array of people. None were hostile and most were warm in their response. You sized up the situation in a fraction of a second to determine your approach. When a man or woman answered a door holding 2 children with three in the background running around with 5 barking dogs, you read very quickly that this person isn’t looking for any kind of a conversation. One woman may even have been nursing an infant although I was careful not to stare to see if this was the case or not. The closest to having someone answer the door naked was a tall fellow wearing only shorts riding below a belly that suggested that he hadn’t seen his feet in a decade or two. I sensed very quickly he didn’t want to talk.

It was hard work and the most enjoyable part of the campaign by far – a valued experience.

With this I can put it behind me.

Bits and Pieces – 20180930, Sunday

Commentary

We tend to view modern borders as somehow sacrosanct and immutable in a legal sense. The reality is given, however, in the following animation. It should restore perspective on situations such as Crimea.

I urge you to watch this 8 minute video that explains the modern left as identity politics:

Of note are the references to Canada both explicit and implicit. A very eloquent presentation.

Bits and Pieces – 20180916, Sunday

Commentary

Your lesson in socialism for today (2:22 minutes) from the economist Milton Friedman:

If, you were engaged by Friedman and want a bit more, watch this one.

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